Maple Balsamic Glazed Garbanzo Beans

One of my strategies when cooking for busy families is to make dishes that can be eaten as is or added to other dishes. My style is kind of mix and match. I often create components rather than cooking full meals. I find this gives families greater flexibility in meeting the needs of a wide range of eaters.

These glazed garbanzo beans are a perfect example of my style.They can be part of a snack, thrown into a school lunch, tossed in a grain bowl, added to sauteed greens or sprinkled on top of a soup or salad.

Another thing I often do is make a big batch of beans and re-purpose it into several different dishes. Garbanzo beans, or pretty much any legume, can become hummus, grain and bean burgers, bean soup or my sauteed garbanzo beans. This recipe can be made with either 2 cups of home cooked beans or one 15 oz can of beans. Keep a few cans of Eden brand beans in your pantry and this can be one of your last minute go-to recipes. If you have never cooked your own garbanzo beans, the flavor and texture are outstanding. They are quite different from the canned version. Here are my instructions for Home Cooked Beans.

I have adapted the original recipe which can be found in Dreena Burton’s cookbook Plant-Powered Families. The link is for her website. I have reduced the sodium and the sweetness a bit. These garbanzo beans are meant to be served soft. I know there are a lot of recipes for crunchy garbanzo beans out there, but I think hard, dry foods are hard on the digestive system and contribute to cravings for sweet foods. So, I try to limit them.

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Maple Balsamic Glazed Garbanzo Beans
(adapted from Roasted Balsamic Chickpeas in Plant-Powered Families by Dreena Burton)

2 cups of garbanzo beans, drained (or 15 oz can Eden brand)
1 1/2 Tbsp balsamic vinegar (I love Napa Valley Naturals Grand Reserve)
1 1/2 tsp shoyu or tamari (alcohol-free, unpasteurized if you can find it)
1 tsp maple syrup or to taste

1. Oven to 400°.

2. If the garbanzo beans were made from scratch and refrigerated in their liquid, you will need to re-heat them before draining. The liquid tends to congeal and won’t drain easily while cold.

2. Measure all the ingredients into a medium size bowl and mix well. Place in a single layer on a large, parchment or silicone lined baking sheet. There will be extra marinade in the bottom of the bowl. Just pour that onto the garbanzo beans and they will soak up the sauce while baking.

3. Bake the garbanzo beans just until they soak up the marinade and turn glossy. Stir once or twice during this process to prevent burning. The garbanzo beans should still be fairly soft when they are done. This process takes about 20-25 minutes depending on the oven.

4. Remove and serve immediately or let cool and store for later use.

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Pinto Beans with Vegan Sausage

I did not grow up liking sliced hot dogs in my baked beans. I was the kind of child who liked to keep my meals simple.

It was only in my macrobiotic studies that I learned the value of incorporating two protein sources into one dish. If you haven’t tried this, you can raise a simple bean dish to a new level of delicious when you add fried tempeh, deep-fried tofu or bits of seitan.

Be careful with the amount of salt in this recipe because the field roast sausage is very high in salt. You might even be able to get away with leaving the shoyu out.

More information about making beans from scratch.IMG_20140702_124752

Pinto Beans with Vegan Sausage

1 cup dried pinto beans, rinsed and soaked at least 8 hours
1/2 cup dried black turtle beans, rinsed and soaked at least 8 hours
postage size piece of kombu or kelp
bay leaf
2-3 tsp olive or grapeseed oil
1 medium onion, diced
1 clove garlic, minced
sea salt
1/2 tsp unpasteurized shoyu or tamari
1 field roast sausage, cut into small bite-size pieces (I used the apple sage flavor.)
2 tsp barley malt, or to taste
1/2 tsp brown rice vinegar (optional)

1.  Drain the beans and place in a large pot. Add water to cover about 1 ” above top of beans. Bring to a boil and scrape off any foam that rises to the surface. Lower the heat to simmer. Add kombu/kelp and bay leaf. Cover and cook until beans are soft. Add more water as necessary, just enough to keep the beans submersed.The beans will take about 1 to 1¼ hours to cook.

2.  While beans are cooking, saute the onion in the oil. Add the minced garlic, one pinch of sea salt and a few tablespoons of water. Lower the heat to simmer and cover. Check frequently and add a little more water if necessary. Cook until onion is very soft. You can actually cook them for as long as you want and they will keep becoming more flavorful.

3.  Add onions to the beans when beans are soft. Add shoyu and cook for 10 more minutes to help incorporate the onions and shoyu.

4.  Stir in the cut vegan sausage and cook for a few minutes longer. Remove from heat and stir in barley malt and brown rice vinegar. Taste and adjust flavors if necessary.

Garbanzo Bean Crepes with Sauteed Vegetables

I didn’t think these would turn into crepes when I first saw the recipe over at Oh She Glows. But, that’s how they turned out for me.

I was looking for a quick simple dinner item and these were a hit. I used the basic garbanzo bean flour to water ratio that Angela uses, but added sautéed vegetables to the batter and spread the batter thin on the pan.IMG_20140609_164921

We made delicious roll-ups. Lena loved them. Continue reading

Curried Lentil Soup

We all need those recipes that satisfy a broad range of different tastes and ages. This is one to take note of. Everyone I know loves this soup, including adults, teenagers and 3-year olds. It’s easy to make, but has a lovely mix of flavors and is a step up from a more traditional lentil soup.

IMG_20140220_160403I discovered this Curried Lentil Soup Recipe in Bon Appétit a few years ago. The only thing I change is to leave out the butter and use Home Cooked Beans instead of canned.

This recipe is also the first time I came across adding puréed beans to a soup. The combination of whole lentils with puréed garbanzo beans is brilliant. The idea lends itself to all sorts of combinations and is especially helpful for vegan families trying to add creaminess to soups and other dishes. I think puréed white beans would add a yummy, mild creaminess to a lot of different soups.

One think to adjust in this recipe is the amount and spiciness of the curry powder. I tone it down for most children. Curry powders can vary in spiciness, too, so taste yours before adding the full amount or add more if you wish.

Enjoy!!

You may also like:
Simple Barley Soup
Turnip and Kale Soup with Leeks

Sweet Vegetable Saute with Fried Tempeh – Vegan MoFo

Late Summer and Autumn is the perfect time for a sweet root vegetable dish. Adding fried tempeh is a great way to give your children some hearty and satisfying vegan protein in a way that is both strengthening and energizing for their active lives.

I originally made this dish for a friend who needs strengthening food that is easy on her digestive system. The moment I finished it, though, I knew it would be a hit with a younger crowd as well.IMG_20130912_125427

Continue reading